Let Us Cross Over The River

By order of the commanding general, I am here to remedy the lack of Civil War blogs on Tumblr. If you have any interest in the Civil War (vaguely interested/mildy/obsessed/
fanatical), then this can be your headquarters. If you have any inquiries or questions, I'll be here. Both Yankees and Rebs accepted of course!
Maj. Gen. KathyRose (well, okay, I'm a 17 year old English girl but no one has to know that!)
Personal blog if anybody's interested: http://amildlookingsky.tumblr.com/

historicaltimes:

A crowd assembled in Court House Square, Ann Arbor, to hear the announcement that war had commenced after Fort Sumter had been fired upon by Confederate forces, April 15, 1861. chubachus:Source.

historicaltimes:

A crowd assembled in Court House Square, Ann Arbor, to hear the announcement that war had commenced after Fort Sumter had been fired upon by Confederate forces, April 15, 1861.

chubachus:

thecivilwarparlor:

Charlotte Forten was Smitten with Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, who Lead the 54th Massachusetts all Black Regiment, Portrayed in the Movie “Glory” by Matthew Broderick.
Charlotte Forten of Philadelphia, the only black teacher on St Helena, described Colonel Shaw- "I am perfectly charmed with Col. S. He seems to me in every way one of the most delightful persons I have ever met. There is something girlish about him, and yet I never saw anyone more manly. To me he seems a perfectly lovable person. And there is something so exquisite about him."
I am more than ever charmed with the noble little Col. What nobleness of soul what exquisite gentleness in that beautiful face! As I look at it I think “The bravest and the tenderest.” To-night he helped me on my horse, and after carefully arranging the folds of my riding skirt, so kindly, “Goodbye. If I don’t see you again down here hope to see you at our Home.” But I hope I have the pleasure of seeing him many times even down here.”
But that was not meant to be, Colonel Shaw was killed with his brave men at Fort Sumter. Propelling them in to history.
Excerpt from the Book "Blue Eyed Child of Fortune" :The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw edited by Russell Duncan

thecivilwarparlor:

Charlotte Forten was Smitten with Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, who Lead the 54th Massachusetts all Black Regiment, Portrayed in the Movie “Glory” by Matthew Broderick.

Charlotte Forten of Philadelphia, the only black teacher on St Helena, described Colonel Shaw- "I am perfectly charmed with Col. S. He seems to me in every way one of the most delightful persons I have ever met. There is something girlish about him, and yet I never saw anyone more manly. To me he seems a perfectly lovable person. And there is something so exquisite about him."

I am more than ever charmed with the noble little Col. What nobleness of soul what exquisite gentleness in that beautiful face! As I look at it I think “The bravest and the tenderest.” To-night he helped me on my horse, and after carefully arranging the folds of my riding skirt, so kindly, “Goodbye. If I don’t see you again down here hope to see you at our Home.” But I hope I have the pleasure of seeing him many times even down here.”

But that was not meant to be, Colonel Shaw was killed with his brave men at Fort Sumter. Propelling them in to history.

Excerpt from the Book "Blue Eyed Child of Fortune" :The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw edited by Russell Duncan

todaysdocument:

The first engagement of the Civil War took place at Fort Sumter on April 12 and 13, 1861. After 34 hours of fighting, the Union surrendered the fort to the Confederates. Major Robert Anderson informed Secretary of War Simon Cameron of the surrender in this telegram, dated April 18.via Our Documents »

todaysdocument:

The first engagement of the Civil War took place at Fort Sumter on April 12 and 13, 1861. After 34 hours of fighting, the Union surrendered the fort to the Confederates. Major Robert Anderson informed Secretary of War Simon Cameron of the surrender in this telegram, dated April 18.
via Our Documents »

pbsthisdayinhistory:

APRIL 12, 1861: The Civil War BeginsOn this day in 1861, the Civil War began with the Confederate army’s attack on Union-controlled Fort Sumter in South Carolina. "Send me your picture" was a common refrain in letters to soldiers from the homefront. The soldiers obliged often sending carte de viste photographs - so-called because they were the size of visiting cards.For more portraits of soldiers, visit Ken Burns’s companion site for his award-wining documentary, The Civil War.
Photos (clockwise): boy soldier, Pvt. Philip Carper (C.S.A), unknown Confederate soldier,  Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Gen. Robert E. Lee, and Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

APRIL 12, 1861: The Civil War Begins

On this day in 1861, the Civil War began with the Confederate army’s attack on Union-controlled Fort Sumter in South Carolina.

"Send me your picture" was a common refrain in letters to soldiers from the homefront. The soldiers obliged often sending carte de viste photographs - so-called because they were the size of visiting cards.

For more portraits of soldiers, visit Ken Burns’s companion site for his award-wining documentary, The Civil War.

Photos (clockwise): boy soldier, Pvt. Philip Carper (C.S.A), unknown Confederate soldier,  Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Gen. Robert E. Lee, and Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

americahistory:

The Confederate States of America Surrender 

On 9 April, 1865 General Robert E. Lee, the Highest ranking Confederate officer, surrendered to Union General, Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

Lee’s surrender marked the unofficial end of the four year American Civil War (which officially ended on 9 May, 1865. The surrender also marked the reunification of the Southern States back into the what was hopefully a more “Perfect Union”

The War claimed the lives of nearly 600,000 Union and Confederate soldiers.

thecivilwarparlor:

Residents Walk Through The Ruins Of Richmond, Virginia, In April Of 1865. 
Richmond served as the capital of the Confederate States of America during the majority of the Civil War. After a long siege in 1865, with General Ulysses S. Grant’s Union troops about to take the city, Confederate troops were ordered to evacuate, destroying bridges and burning supplies they they could not carry. A massive fire swept through Richmond, destroying large parts of the city. About one week after the evacuation of Richmond, Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Grant in near Appomattox, Virginia, on April 9, 1865. (Alexander Gardner/LOC)
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/civilwar020812/c48_0000434a.jpg

thecivilwarparlor:

Residents Walk Through The Ruins Of Richmond, Virginia, In April Of 1865.

Richmond served as the capital of the Confederate States of America during the majority of the Civil War. After a long siege in 1865, with General Ulysses S. Grant’s Union troops about to take the city, Confederate troops were ordered to evacuate, destroying bridges and burning supplies they they could not carry. A massive fire swept through Richmond, destroying large parts of the city. About one week after the evacuation of Richmond, Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Grant in near Appomattox, Virginia, on April 9, 1865. (Alexander Gardner/LOC)

http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/civilwar020812/c48_0000434a.jpg