Let Us Cross Over The River

By order of the commanding general, I am here to remedy the lack of Civil War blogs on Tumblr. If you have any interest in the Civil War (vaguely interested/mildy/obsessed/fanatical), then this can be your headquarters. If you have any inquiries or questions, I'll be here. Both Yankees and Rebs accepted of course! Maj. Gen. KathyRose (well, okay, I'm a 19 year old English girl but no one has to know that!) Personal blog if anybody's interested: http://amildlookingsky.tumblr.com/

bantarleton:

Top: View from Confederate breastworks at the summit of Kennesaw Mountain. 

Bottom: View from Union trenchworks near the foot of Kennesaw Mountain. 

On June 27th 1864 Federal forces attacked Confederates holding defensive positions on the heights of Kennesaw Mountain. The attack was repulsed with 3,000 Union casualties to the rebels’ 1,000. 

chubachus:

View of Union soldiers and civilians attending the dedication ceremony of the Bull Run monument, June 10, 1865. By William Morris Smith.

Source.

thecivilwarparlor:

Washington Along Pennsylvania Ave. Parade To Help Boost The Nation’s Morale - May 23 and 24, 1865, Sherman Later Called The Experience “the happiest and most satisfactory moment of my life.”
President Johnson’s grand review of the Union Army at the end of the Civil War was one of the greatest parades in the Nation’s history. During a 2-day period (May 23-24, 1865), approximately 200,000 troops. led by Gen. George G. Meade on the first day and Gen. William T. Sherman on the second, marched down Pennsylvania Avenue.(Library of Congress, Mathew B. Brady.)
May 23 was a clear, brilliantly sunny day. Starting from Capitol Hill, the Army of the Potomac marched down Pennsylvania Avenue before virtually the entire population of Washington, a throng of thousands cheering and singing favorite Union marching songs. At the reviewing stand in front of the White House were President Johnson, General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant, and top government officials. Leading the day’s march, General Meade dismounted in front of the stand and joined the dignitaries to watch the parade. His army made an awesome sight: a force of 80,000 infantrymen marching 12 across with impeccable precision, along with hundreds of pieces of artillery and a seven-mile line of cavalrymen that alone took an hour to pass. One already famous cavalry officer, George Armstrong Custer, gained the most attention that day-either by design or because his horse was spooked when he temporarily lost control of his mount, causing much excitement as he rode by the reviewing stand twice.
Source: The Civil War Society’s “Encyclopedia of the Civil War”

thecivilwarparlor:

Washington Along Pennsylvania Ave. Parade To Help Boost The Nation’s Morale - May 23 and 24, 1865, Sherman Later Called The Experience “the happiest and most satisfactory moment of my life.”

President Johnson’s grand review of the Union Army at the end of the Civil War was one of the greatest parades in the Nation’s history. During a 2-day period (May 23-24, 1865), approximately 200,000 troops. led by Gen. George G. Meade on the first day and Gen. William T. Sherman on the second, marched down Pennsylvania Avenue.(Library of Congress, Mathew B. Brady.)

May 23 was a clear, brilliantly sunny day. Starting from Capitol Hill, the Army of the Potomac marched down Pennsylvania Avenue before virtually the entire population of Washington, a throng of thousands cheering and singing favorite Union marching songs. At the reviewing stand in front of the White House were President Johnson, General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant, and top government officials. Leading the day’s march, General Meade dismounted in front of the stand and joined the dignitaries to watch the parade. His army made an awesome sight: a force of 80,000 infantrymen marching 12 across with impeccable precision, along with hundreds of pieces of artillery and a seven-mile line of cavalrymen that alone took an hour to pass. One already famous cavalry officer, George Armstrong Custer, gained the most attention that day-either by design or because his horse was spooked when he temporarily lost control of his mount, causing much excitement as he rode by the reviewing stand twice.

Source: The Civil War Society’s “Encyclopedia of the Civil War”

revwarheart:

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, photographer Michael Falco is shooting a project titled “Civil War 150 Pinhole Project.” His goal is to highlight the haunting beauty of civil war battlefields and to chronicle the various battle reenactments that are happening all across the country. To do so, he’s using large format pinhole cameras that gives the poetic images an old fashioned look.

View full set here: http://petapixel.com/2013/02/14/civil-war-reenactments-photographed-with-a-large-format-pinhole-camera/