Let Us Cross Over The River

By order of the commanding general, I am here to remedy the lack of Civil War blogs on Tumblr. If you have any interest in the Civil War (vaguely interested/mildy/obsessed/fanatical), then this can be your headquarters. If you have any inquiries or questions, I'll be here. Both Yankees and Rebs accepted of course! Maj. Gen. KathyRose (well, okay, I'm a 19 year old English girl but no one has to know that!) Personal blog if anybody's interested: http://amildlookingsky.tumblr.com/

chubachus:

Two young soldiers kneeling before graves on the First Battle of Bull Run battlefield near Sudley Church, March 1862. By George Barnard. Animated stereoscopic photographs.

Source.

chubachus:

Two young soldiers kneeling before graves on the First Battle of Bull Run battlefield near Sudley Church, March 1862. By George Barnard. Animated stereoscopic photographs.

letuscrossovertheriver:

July 21st, 1861 

The First Battle of Bull Run, or the First Manassas (the name given by Confederate forces), the first major land battle of the American Civil War, was fought in Prince William County, Virginia. Maj. Gen Irvin McDowell attacked the Confederate left flank and the Confederate forces were driven back to Henry Hill. However, when Confederate reinforcements arrived, the Southern forces were able to fight back and the day ended in a Confederate victory. This battle is also known as where then Maj. Gen Thomas Jackson gained the nickname ‘Stonewall’. (x) (x) (x

necclibrary:

Today marks the Anniversary of the 54th Massachusetts regiment’s assault on Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863. The above photos show Robert Gould Shaw, Private Abraham F. Brown, the beach approach to Fort Wagner, and the tattered flags of the regiment. 

The movie “Glory” popularized the 54th and its mission, but here are some great sites with more information about these soldiers:

Massachusetts Historical Society - The 54th Regiment

The Civil War Trust - Fort Wagner and the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

National Park Service - Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment

just—history:

The 150th Pennsylvania Infantry camp on Belle Plain, Virginia, three weeks before the Battle of Chancellorsville, March 1862. [1247×842]

just—history:

The 150th Pennsylvania Infantry camp on Belle Plain, Virginia, three weeks before the Battle of Chancellorsville, March 1862. [1247×842]

theprivatewiththewrongprivates:

Why do I love to portray dying soldiers so much? Personally, I think it leaves a big impact on the spectators who usually just come to watch the cannons go boom and the horses gallop around. There’s nothing wrong with being casually interested in the war, but I really believe that it’s important to make sure that they know it wasn’t fun and games. Real people spilled their blood, and real people mourned for them. I don’t think falling down on the field and then immediately taking a nap does any good for anyone.

There’s also so much pathos in a field hospital scene. In the past, I’ve watched some field hospital scenarios where they just casually talk about what they’re doing like they’re explaining the Pythagorean theorem. It’s not about that. The field hospitals after a battle were horrendous. I think it’s good for the spectators to be able to see that, to see that the battle they just watched had its consequences.

This is something that you can’t learn from a text book or in a classroom.   

“Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means for peace.”

Ulysses S. Grant, post-Presidential speech in London, England during Grant’s world tour (via deadpresidents)